Category - Kathryn Peck

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Kathryn M. Peck, MD: Brayden’s Story

Brayden’s Story

fb_brayden_kathryn_peckOur family came to Dr. Peck in hopes that we had finally found someone with the kind of pediatric expertise we needed, and the kind of compassion shown by a mother that we desired. Her bedside manner was amazing & genuine with every single encounter! Not once did I ever feel like a bother to her with my many questions. She even helped me make sure every question on my list had an answer written down before I left each visit. She looked at my son as a kid, as our future, not just as an experiment or a paycheck. She took an interest in him as a person.  She made sure he was comfortable during our visits and felt included. She got his opinion on things and asked what questions he had.

Brayden had lost his left thumb due to a lawnmower accident just days after his 5th birthday.  Several doctors on different panels across the U.S. called Brayden’s case a head-scratcher because of the CMC joint now missing after the accident. With minimal options,  we were originally preparing to wrap a very active toddler like a mummy for 4 weeks to be able to allow the skin to grow so that they could do the pollicization – moving the index finger down to the thumb area.  Dr. Peck reached out to one of her fellow surgeons that had done 1000’s of these surgeries to see if there was any way to keep us from going through more stress.  We gave the situation to God, and waited.  The day before the skin flap surgery, I got an exciting call from Dr. Peck from her personal cell phone on a Sunday afternoon saying she had spoken with her colleague and they both had faith that she could make this work without the flap.  We went forward with the pollicization.  The day of surgery, I felt like things were in the hands of a lifelong friend, not just some surgeon. The kind of trust that had built up, and the compassion that came from Dr. Peck, took every worry I had ever had and threw it out the window.

After 28 days in a cast, and a few months of therapy, Brayden was able to master just about anything you put in front of him!  April 1, 2017, a year after the surgery, I am ecstatic to report that there is nothing that this happy boy can’t do!  He can even push buttons through holes, which we didn’t think he would be able to do.  He has more movement & mobility than they thought possible with the missing CMC joint; and we have God & Dr. Kathryn Peck to thank for such an amazing outcome and bright future!

Crystal Clairday

Kathryn M. Peck leads at Curiosity, Confidence, Challenge workshop

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Kathryn M. Peck, M.D. recently took part in the workshop “Curiosity, Confidence, Challenge.” It is a conference for middle school girls on careers in science, technology, engineering, and math held by Sycamore School in Indianapolis. It was the 20th consecutive year of the conference, an event designed to heighten girls’ interest in STEM careers and encourage them to select high school courses that will lead to success in college.  For the past several years, they have reached the maximum capacity of 400 middle school girls from all regions of Indiana in attendance at the conference.

The girls select four workshops from a total of 29 disciplines related to STEM careers. Women volunteers from each of these fields lead the 40 minute workshops with 5-10 minutes of enthusiastic discussion on their personal background, education, job responsibilities, career possibilities, etc.  The remaining 30-35 minutes are spent on a hands-on activity, or activities, related to their field.  The girls loved the hands-on aspect of the conference.  There are a maximum of 12 girls in each of the six workshop sessions.  The workshop leaders are a diverse group of professional women from large corporations (Lilly, Rolls-Royce, Allison Transmission, Dow AgroSciences), universities (Butler, IUPUI, Rose-Hulman), health care facilities (IU School of Medicine, Veterans Affairs, Zionsville Country Vet), parks departments, and small businesses.

Kathryn M. Peck featured on Publication Cover

Dr. Kathryn M. Peck is featured on the cover of the “Guide for Women in Orthopaedic Surgery” 2nd Edition. The Guide is distributed by the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society. Past fellow Michelle James, MD is also on the cover.

The Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society (RJOS) is the oldest surgical women’s organization incorporated in the United States which continues to grow and welcome new members of both genders. RJOS works closely with the AAOS, provides leadership training for orthopaedists, residents and medical students, provides mentoring for medical students, offers award and grants opportunities, courtesy of Zimmer, Inc., and conducts a medical student workshop and much more. Please look around and consider becoming a member today!To find out more please visit http://rjos.org

Kathryn M. Peck
Photo Caption for top photo on cover: (L-R) Michelle James, MD, unknown, Lisa Lattanza, MD, unknown, Kathryn Peck, MD, Claire Manske, MD

Radial Longitudinal Deficiency

By: Kathryn M. Peck, M.D.

Radial longitudinal deficiency (RLD) is a condition in which the radius bone of the forearm is underdeveloped or absent, resulting in the hand and wrist that angles toward the thumb-side of the forearm. It is a congenital condition (present at birth) in which the radius (the inner bone that connects the elbow to the forearm) did not form correctly in the womb. The radius may be malformed or missing.

radial longitudinal deficiencyIN RADIAL LONGITUDINAL DEFICIENCY:

•    The affected arm is smaller, and stiffness of the fingers and elbow are often present
•    The forearm curves inward because the radius is malformed or missing
•    The thumb is either very small or missing
•    The severity of the condition is different in each child

CAUSES OF RADIAL LONGITUDINAL DEFICIENCY:

A baby’s arm forms between week 4 and week 8 of pregnancy, and by week 8, the arms are fully formed but very small.  In some instances, a cause cannot be determined for radial longitudinal deficiency. In other cases, it can be part of a syndrome that affects multiple body parts, including VACTREL, Holt Oram Syndrome, Fanconi’s Anemia, and TAR Syndrome (Thrombocytopenia Absent Radius syndrome).

The heart, kidneys, intestines, blood cells, and limbs form at about the same time. Therefore, problems in these other areas need to be evaluated and often treated before the arm is treated.

DIAGNOSIS:

Radial longitudinal deficiency can sometimes be seen on ultrasound.  After the baby is born, diagnosis is confirmed through a physical exam and x-rays.

radial longitudinal deficiency

TREATMENT:

The main goal and benefit of treat is to improve the child’s ability to function with the condition, in addition to improving the appearance of the hand.

Treatment is based on each child because it depends on the complexity of the condition.
•    Stretching
•    Splinting or casting
•    Physical therapy (to help increase strength and function)
•    Prosthetics (in the case of missing parts or bones)
•    Adaptive Aids (to help with daily activities such as getting dressed and personal hygiene)
•    Surgery (to help reposition the wrist, stabilize or create a thumb, or lengthening the shorten arm to help with daily care.

In most cases, surgery is done before the child reaches school age but generally not before 6 months of age. In all cases, the goal of surgery is to repair any associated abnormalities, and improve range of motion and function.

Radial longitudinal deficiency requires a comprehensive approach to the child and family to give the best possible outcome.